Scotland has been in the news in recent months for several efforts to make it easier for people to “change their sex.”

Most recently a plan was proposed to let people simply self-identify as either man or woman, or something else, alleviating them of any obligation to undergo counseling or treatment.

Now the most extreme supporters of that idea have proposed an option for children to be allowed to change their sex on their birth certificate even if their parents object.

The Scottish Daily Mail explained: “State snoopers should be allowed to help children legally change their gender if parents are at odds over the issue, Scottish councils have proposed.”

Several governmental councils in Scotland have suggested the failed Named Persons program should be used to let transgender children change their birth certificates even in opposition to their parents wishes, the report said.

A consultation document, essentially a government review of the issue, was released recently.

The “self-identify” plan included lowering the minimum age to change a birth certificate from 18 to 16.

“But ministers also sought opinions on ‘options’ for under-16s amid growing numbers of children seeking help for gender dysphoria,” the report said.

So a number of organizations said the Named Persons could step in to “provide consent” if the parents won’t.

That program had been prepared to give a teacher or social worker designated for each child the authority to override parental decisions.

The U.K. Supreme Court, however, threw it out as a violation of human rights agreements.

The Aberdeen City Council said of the new issue, “Perhaps it would be considered appropriate for the Named Person or lead professional to provide consent if transition is seen to be in the best interests of the child.”

While transgender activists promoted the plan to let people self-identify, others raised concerns.

“It could put women’s privacy and dignity at risk in changing rooms or when they are receiving medical care,” the report noted.

A spokesman for religious organizations who opposed – and ultimately defeated – the original Named Person plan said, “It is preposterous to suggest the detested Named Person scheme be used to ride roughshod over the views of mums and dads.”

The organization Christian Concern released a statement saying: “The Scottish Government is to be rebuked for even proposing gender recognition for children under 16. Late adolescence is a time when many are still vulnerable to the power of suggestion and peer pressure.”