With France brought to its knees by the country’s worst unrest in half a century, as citizens protested Emmanuel Macron, there will be increasing concern amongst the globalist establishment over the future of the French president they hailed as the saviour of Europe.

Reports have showed a country in chaos over the past three weeks, with hundreds of people wounded and a number killed in anti-government protests which, despite disruption and violence, enjoy from a large majority of the population.

Against so-called green taxes and a major squeeze in French workers’ cost of living, the Yellow Jackets movement represents “a rejection of all things Macron”, the liberal U.S. magazine Slate this week.

But since he came to power last May, globalists around the world said the French president’s rise marked a political ‘’ against “division” and “hate”, with many insisting his brand of “radical centrism” was a formula that should be imposed on their own nations.

This sentiment has been particularly prevalent amongst Britain’s pro-EU elite, with Liberal Democrats leader Vince Cable — who previously Brexit as the result of elderly voters’ ‘white nostalgia’, and ‘church hall-dwelling’ Leave voters to “jihadis” — telling UK voters his party could “offer the same formula as Macron”.

After writing several articles lavishing praise on the French premier, Alastair Campbell — who served as Iraq war architect Tony Blair’s spin doctor under the former prime minister’s Labour regime — has been uncharacteristically quiet since the start of France’s developing crisis, tweeting recently only to that Macron “has a very large brain”.

Particularly laudable, Campbell, was Macron’s vow to slash carbon emissions through the same ‘green’ agenda which has driven French workers onto the streets in recent weeks to protest the rising cost-of-living and massive fuel tax hikes.

Unsurprisingly, another arch-Remainer who has revealed herself to be in awe of Macron is Anna Soubry, the Tory former defence minister who opponents of mass migration are “ignorant” and “racist”, and who an audience of Muslims that the UK “would be a better country” if “white British people … learned more from your community”.

Just in October, when the French leader’s fast-sinking approval rating was well on its way to this month’s of 23 per cent, the reportedly deeply unpopular Broxtowe MP tweeted “there’s never been a better time for a British Macron” in a post which linked to an article alleging that a neoliberal, ‘social justice’-pursuing political force led by a globalist figure such as “Ruth Davidson, David Miliband [or] Chuka Ummuna (sic)” would “do rather well” at the ballot box.

Miliband returning to UK politics to lead the country as a ‘British Macron’ seems to be a major hope among many in the Europhile elite, after the former foreign secretary fueled rumours of a comeback in recent months, campaigning against Brexit.

The failed Labour leadership candidate moved to New York in 2013 to take the helm at the International Rescue Committee (IRC), a George Soros-backed which works to transfer refugee populations to Western nations.

Macron is Europe’s “best hope for the future”, Miliband tweeted last year, linking to a Reuters article reporting the then-newly elected leader of France had declared that Poland must not be allowed to “define the Europe of tomorrow” after the eastern EU state’s pro-sovereignty government rejected orders from Brussels to welcome illegal immigrants from the third world.

Another Miliband praising Macron’s pro-mass migration politics approvingly paraphrased Soros, who said that the continuing illegal entry of millions of migrants to European shores must become “the new normal”.

Macron’s that Europe is entering an “unprecedented” age of mass migration, in which absorbing as many as hundreds of millions of Africans is the bloc’s destiny, somewhat conflicts with the leader’s claim it would be necessary to enact punishing ‘green’ taxes on French workers to ‘wean’ the country off fossil fuels to stop global warming.

Given the president’s insistence that hit his countrymen should be hit in the pocket with fuel tax rises in order to lower emissions, it is unclear why he advocates a policy which would vastly  global CO2 output through transferring populations from low-polluting parts of the world to rich nations where residents have a far higher carbon footprint.